Naturalistic Neurodiversity

Exploring our differences through science.

Posts Tagged ‘Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Ableism in Atheism Anonymous #43

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Do you consider yourself to be a person with a disability?

No.

Have you (or do you personally know someone who has) felt out-of-place or limited your involvement with an atheist community because of disability-related situations?

No.

What steps could atheist communities take to become more inclusive?

Awareness is the first step. Meetings at accessible places, facilities for disabled people, polite pointing out of ablest language – idiom is a strong force, and just as sexist language is often a matter of ingrained idiom I suspect ableist language will be also. People shouldn’t be vilified for well intentioned mistakes, though those who become assholes when challenged are fair game šŸ™‚

Response #43 from theĀ Ableism in Atheism survey.

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Written by The Nerd

May 30, 2012 at 12:00 pm

Ableism in Atheism Anonymous #40

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Do you consider yourself to be a person with a disability?

Mental:
Tourettes, Depression, OCD, ADD. We suspect ASD but don’t have a diagnosis.

Have you (or do you personally know someone who has) felt out-of-place or limited your involvement with an atheist community because of disability-related situations?

I frequently am bothered by the assertion that “religion is crazy” or “religion is a mental illness” As someone who actually has a mental illness

What steps could atheist communities take to become more inclusive?

Stop the fucking “religion is crazy” rhetoric. Focus on the cruelty, and fundamental incoherence of religion not attacking them by making ableist comments

Any other thoughts about ableism and atheism?

It was literally my first encounter with atheism. I was an officer in the religious studies club giving a talk on Norse PaganismĀ (my belief system before I became atheist) and literally the first comment out of the local Atheist club’s mouth was “How fucking crazy do you have to be to believe that shit.”

Response #40 from theĀ Ableism in Atheism survey.

Ableism in Atheism Anonymous #35

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Do you consider yourself to be a person with a disability?

No.

Have you (or do you personally know someone who has) felt out-of-place or limited your involvement with an atheist community because of disability-related situations?

No.

Any other thoughts about ableism and atheism?

I work with the Disabled Students Program at UCSB, so I’m perhaps a little more aware of ADA issues than most people. When I notice accessibility issues with websites I try to inform someone. On occasion I have transcribed the textual images or short audio/video clips in comment forums, and had had people express that they are deaf or blind and rely on things like that.

I think it’s yet another area of privilege. Most people don’t mean to make things difficult for disabled, but are just not aware of the issues. I routinely remind businesses that they cannot block the sidewalk with their signs. Real Estate agents are the worst, and often have to simply be referred to the city’s code enforcement division.

Response #35 from theĀ Ableism in Atheism survey.

Ableism in Atheism Anonymous #30

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Do you consider yourself to be a person with a disability?

I am mentally disordered and disabled: Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Schizoid Personality Disorder, ADD, and sensory processing/integration problems.

I also have motor dysgraphia, which is a minor physical impairment.

Have you (or do you personally know someone who has) felt out-of-place or limited your involvement with an atheist community because of disability-related situations?

Inappropriate treatment of/reactions to my service dog; assumptions about my comfort level with physical contact.

What steps could atheist communities take to become more inclusive?

It would be really great if people could be more educated about service dogs and rules about talking to/petting/feeding them (don’t do any of the above, ever.) ADA-compliant facilities would also be nice; going out is hard enough without being entry challenged because I don’t “look disabled.”

It’s even worse when other people in the group say that.

Any other thoughts about ableism and atheism?

Mental disabiliities are often invisible, but it doesn’t make them any less disabling.

The above has been response #30 from theĀ Ableism in Atheism survey.

Ableism in Atheism Anonymous #3

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Do you consider yourself to be a person with a disability?

Psychological disability due to schizoaffective disorder (schizophrenia + major depressive disorder), Tourette’s, GAD, and OCD.

Have you (or do you personally know someone who has) felt out-of-place or limited your involvement with an atheist community because of disability-related situations?

No.

What steps could atheist communities take to become more inclusive?

Make more educational videos, because I think a lot of people would rather watch a video than read a blog or article. Ā If there’s entertainment in it for them, they will be more receptive to the message.

Any other thoughts about ableism and atheism?

I have actually found that atheist/secular communities are far more inclusive to people with mental illnesses than religious communities, although I can’t really speak for how atheist/secular groups treat individuals with other disabilities, as my disabilities are “invisible.”

Response #3 from theĀ Ableism in Atheism survey.