Naturalistic Neurodiversity

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Posts Tagged ‘Asthma

Ableism in Atheism Anonymous #58

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Do you consider yourself to be a person with a disability?

Physical and Mental

  • Dyslexia
  • Dyspraxia
  • Asthma (to the point wher i cannot run)

Have you (or do you personally know someone who has) felt out-of-place or limited your involvement with an atheist community because of disability-related situations?

Blogs/ Websites using small fonts with little contrast between the text and the background. (Stick with black and white it works.)
Walls of text with no structure to break it up for those of us with reading dificulties.

What steps could atheist communities take to become more inclusive?

Pay more attention to the text you use. both it’s structure, the font and the colours used.
Sans Serif font is best for easy reading (Yes even comic sans)
Black text and white bacgrounds are standard for a reason. It works well with the various coloured reading aids.
Sub headings in large amounts of text are your friend.

Any other thoughts about ableism and atheism?

Predjudice of all kinds is stupid. atheism is not immune from stupid bigoted idionts and probably never will be. But some of us can improve things.

Response #58 from the Ableism in Atheism survey.

Note: I have done my best to find a clean, simple, readable (and free) WordPress theme. If anyone has any suggestions for improvement, let me know.

Written by The Nerd

June 9, 2012 at 12:00 pm

Ableism in Atheism Anonymous #14

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Do you consider yourself to be a person with a disability?

parent of child with disability

physical: multiple life-threatening food allergies, including contact allergy, asthma and atopic dermatitis

Have you (or do you personally know someone who has) felt out-of-place or limited your involvement with an atheist community because of disability-related situations?

I asked Minnesota Camp Quest for accommodation for my son’s food allergies and asthma a couple years ago, including my attendence at camp as a health aide, his carrying epi-pen and inhaler, a place in the kitchen to heat up pre-made meals, campers washing their hands after eating and a place for a minifridge.  He was denied access.  I was severely disappointed.  There just aren’t that many places for atheist kids to feel comfortable.

What steps could atheist communities take to become more inclusive?

Accommodate when requested.  An example, I host a meet-up for atheist women, we usually sit at bar chairs.  When a woman in a chair attended, we offered to move to a table where all of us were at a table.  Not a big deal.

Any other thoughts about ableism and atheism?

Thanks for doing the survey!

Response #14 from the Ableism in Atheism survey.