Naturalistic Neurodiversity

Exploring our differences through science.

Archive for the ‘PTSD’ Category

Ableism in Atheism Anonymous #61

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Do you consider yourself to be a person with a disability?

I struggle with anxiety disorders: Mental disorders, including anxiety issues, PTSD, and OCD.

Have you (or do you personally know someone who has) felt out-of-place or limited your involvement with an atheist community because of disability-related situations?

I’ve friends with autism that feel uncomfortable when others find out, and others with anxiety issues that prevent them from public interaction.  My anxiety issues have kept me from attending several public events.  There are some older people especially with hearing problems that don’t go out because they cannot hear anything.

What steps could atheist communities take to become more inclusive?

Ensure that some of the meetup environments are conducive to communicating when you have hearing issues.  Make sure there are different types of meetups for the variety of members your organization has- from outgoing to introverted, and create an active online community so people that are indisposed or anxious feel included.

Any other thoughts about ableism and atheism?

Thank you for this, it’s a great topic we need to approach, especially as religious people are shutting out the differently abled.

Response #61 from the Ableism in Atheism survey.

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Written by The Nerd

July 1, 2012 at 12:00 pm

Posted in Ableism, Atheism, GAD, PTSD

Ableism in Atheism Anonymous #52

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Do you consider yourself to be a person with a disability?

Mental, though I suppose it is not technically a disability: PTSD, which makes it very difficult for me to actually leave my house and interact with people, even people I know, but especially people I don’t know.

Have you (or do you personally know someone who has) felt out-of-place or limited your involvement with an atheist community because of disability-related situations?

There are other things, attitudes and behaviors of the community, which keep me from risking interaction, but not specifically because someone referenced my mental or physical ability.

What steps could atheist communities take to become more inclusive?

For people like me, maybe online meeting options where I could participate from home? Live chat from conferences or streaming video?  I would think it would also be helpful for people who just live too far away and can’t afford to travel.

Response #52 from the Ableism in Atheism survey.

Written by The Nerd

June 4, 2012 at 12:00 pm

Ableism in Atheism Anonymous #33

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Do you consider yourself to be a person with a disability?

Diagnosed with PTSD and Panic Disorder, both controlled pretty well with medication at this point.

Have you (or do you personally know someone who has) felt out-of-place or limited your involvement with an atheist community because of disability-related situations?

I know fellow atheists whose interactions with other atheists have been strained, or worse, by the second groups use of terms the first group considered bigoted.  Conflicts arise between those who want to put sensitivity of terminology as a high priority, above freedom to say what they wish, and those who view things in the opposite way.

What steps could atheist communities take to become more inclusive?

The two groups don’t seem quite ready to compromise just yet, and I don’t think this can be forced.  It’s going to take time.  “Comment policies” would turn people off.  Only persuasion will work in the desired manner.

The above has been response #33 from the Ableism in Atheism survey.

Ableism in Atheism Anonymous #2

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Do you consider yourself to be a person with a disability? If so, what?

Have you (or do you personally know someone who has) felt out-of-place or limited your involvement with an atheist community because of disability-related situations?

No.

What steps could atheist communities take to become more inclusive?

Host a variety of events to cater to people of all needs.

Any other thoughts about ableism and atheism?

The misogyny problem is a lot harder for people struggling with PTSD to deal with and makes us want to avoid some functions to avoid being around a “boys club” or even in internet groups/communities.

Response #2 from the Ableism in Atheism survey.

Written by The Nerd

April 22, 2012 at 12:00 pm

Ableism in Atheism Anonymous #1

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Do you consider yourself to be a person with a disability? If so, what?

ADHD

Have you (or do you personally know someone who has) felt out-of-place or limited your involvement with an atheist community because of disability-related situations?

Yes, sometimes I know I can’t take extra sensory input or contentious discussions, so I stay home instead. Other times I employ the help of my partner to tell me if I’m being rude, or I bring something to crochet in order to calm my mind.

What steps could atheist communities take to become more inclusive?

Try to host more events on the weekends as opposed to the week nights. It also helps if it’s earlier in the day too, as opposed to all night long. I’ve already used up my emotional/mental reserves by the end of the work day. This tends to result in me skipping events I was hoping to attend.

Any other thoughts about ableism and atheism?

I recognize that my requests might be at odds with what someone would need who works nights and weekends, for example. I suppose diversity in event planning is the best approach.

Response #1 from the Ableism in Atheism survey. This response is my own.

Written by The Nerd

April 21, 2012 at 3:00 pm